Tag Archives: National Parks

Dead trees of Angel Terrace

The lower terraces of Mammoth Hot Springs in
Yellowstone are pretty interesting. It’s a region with
stepping levels of limestone formed by the hot springs
that flow out. And, if there is a tree in it’s way,
the tree will ultimately be surrounded and starved by
the mineral deposits. It makes for an extremely
contrasty sight! But, thanks to modern camera sensors,
I’m able to bring back the color to this image.

In Angel Terrace of Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park, you see these wide spaces that have consumed trees with the minerals of hotsprings that have flowed intermitently over the last several decades.
In Angel Terrace of Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park, you see these wide spaces that have consumed trees with the minerals of hotsprings that have flowed intermitently over the last several decades.

Chasing the Sunset

Here is another photo of when I went to the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin. The sun was making it’s last goodbye and people were getting the message that it was probably time to leave the ice. These people were running so fast that in my bracket of photos I took, this was the only frame their silhouettes appeared in.

Chasing the sunset

 

I learned quite a bit from being up there. I hope we are lucky enough next winter, but something tells me that it won’t happen again for a while.

Apostle Islands Keyhole Arch

This archway at the Apostle Islands National Lake Shore was really cool. There were several photographers lined up here to take pictures of the coming sunset. It was a lot of fun being there. I hope to get there again some day.

Keyhole arch in the Lake Superior Apostle Islands National Lake Shore in Wisconsin
Keyhole arch in the Lake Superior Apostle Islands National Lake Shore in Wisconsin

Yellowstone June 2014.

Tower Falls -20140625Memories of good times begin to fade. What remains is what want to keep most. We keep some contrasts, let some go. We keep parts in focus and let other details fade. Colors can be lost, but the structure revealed.

Yellowstone doesn’t solve any questions for me but reveals new challenges, too. I don’t know if Yellowstone as a vacation can ever be considered a “success”. It is the complete essence of the frase “it isn’t the destination but the journey.” The problem is that it is so vast that it always presents new journeys and challenges.

I probably won’t back there this year, but I hope to make it happen next year. More of my memories of this amazing landscape will probably fade in a similar way to this.

Grand Tetons

In the middle of the day from the north end of the range. I spent two nights in the Tetons this summer. The first night, the clouds were good and thick. There were also good and thick in the morning, but I did get a rainbow. I was headed back to my campsite for the afternoon because I was up since 4 am. But as I got back I saw that the clouds were beginning to break up and become more interesting.

Grand Tetons

Inside the Window

Inside the windowSunrise inside the North Window Arch at Arches National Park.Sometimes you just got to go black and white with the red sandstone at Arches National Park. There’s so much detail in the rock and so much natural contrast that color is just a distraction.

Inside the window
Sunrise from inside the North Window Arch at Arches National Park, Moab, UT.

Yellowstone’s Tower Falls River

In Yellowstone, particularly along the north side of their “Grand Loop” you can almost get tired of seeing all the waterfalls that this park has! It really is an amazing place to be. This photo I got when I was photographing the river that feeds into the Tower Falls. It’s a great waterfall to see and I highly recommend it. But when I was there, one of the main lookouts was damaged and in the midst of repairs. But the river that feeds into the water falls can be seen from the road. 

I explored the area just a little bit. I also took a long exposure of this same river from the bridge. I’ll probably share that in the future, too. But I wasn’t satisfied with that so I looked for a way to get closer to the river. Sure enough, there was a “little” rain wash gutter for rain water that hits the road to find its way into the river. I walked in (it wasn’t really that little if I could fit!) and set up my tripod at the last possible stable spot before I’d be taking a trip over the waterfall, too. 

This is a cascade as it reaches it's water fall at the Tower Falls in Yellowstone National Park
This is a cascade as it reaches it’s water fall at the Tower Falls in Yellowstone National Park

But on the other side of the river, I could make out what looked like an opening that would be perfect for some hoofed animal to come up to and drink from the river. I took a bracket of photos and got on my way. There were some mosquitoes there that were too happy to have me around. 

I was pretty happy with this view. I cropped it down to focus on the other side of the river. I hope you enjoy.

 

North Window Arch (My gateway to The Arcanum)

This is another photo that I had redone after getting more knowledge from The Arcanum. This is a recent photo. In fact, I had taken this photo ONE DAY before I got the e-mail telling me that my mentor / master, had chosen me. It was also among the first photos I processed from my vacation. I was very excited to have this photo when I first posted it. I still am proud of the photo. But I know that I would have been far more effective taking another photo like this in the future!

 

At the intersection of stone, horizon, sky, and sunrise: The North Window Arch at Arches National Park
At the intersection of stone, horizon, sky, and sunrise: The North Window Arch at Arches National Park

What did I do differently? Well, in the original, the sky was getting a tonal shift. In this one, the sky is much smoother. The rest is finer detail work that increased the detail of the stones. I can honestly say it is an improvement! 

Sandstone Arch

The Sandstone Arch in Arches National Park is a really neat site. It is about three quarters of the way through the park on their main roadway. I highly recommend seeing it. It’s not along trail but it is a very unique one. The previous picture I released showed one of the ‘fins’ you have to walk between in order to get here.
DSC04440-Edit-20140630

As you can see, the colors of the sandstone is quite impressive. There are many variations of magenta, reds, oranges, and purples in these stone layers.

You have to walk past this cotton wood tree to get here, btw. But you still have to have water with you! When I got to this I knew I was already a bit dehydrated, but I also knew that it was a very short walk. If I knew the water spigot was not too far away, I think I would have stopped for that, first.

Why do I bring that up? I made a mistake in some of my shots here. I left my tripod in a scene. I wouldn’t have done that if I was thinking clearly. I would have been thinking clearly if I was hydrated.

Why did it take so long for me to post this? I’ve been learning a lot in The Arcanum. I put several new techniques into processing this. It’s funny, what I would have done two months ago would have been to just get it to where I’m ‘ok’ with it. But what did that feel like to me back then? It felt like I was turning in my homework incomplete but passable. Even now, I feel that there are a few small things I could do better, but I’m much more confident that these things that could have been done are minutia to most people.

I’m learning more and more every day. I only learn by doing. I’ve done a lot that I’m sitting on until after I’ve gone through a critique with my master/teacher in about a week.

I hope you enjoy it.

Thanks & more to come, swear.

Inside the Fins of Arches National Park

The geology is very interesting at Arches National Park. I highly recommend watching the video in the visitors center. I will try to summarize it in three sentences. The video was like 45 minutes long. So, don’t hold me to this!

Basically, there was a big salt dome that formed under ground that pushed all the ground above it up. The dome that formed cracked and created ‘fins’ and arches. Once the salt left, the dome collapsed and the fins came back together, leaving little slits that you can sometimes walk through.

What you see here is just one such fin that you have to walk through to see the “sandstone arch”. They are all made of sandstone, btw. But this one is actually called the sandstone arch. I think this has to do with the fact that there is a lot of loose sand here.

Walking inside a 'fin' on the way to see the 'Sandstone Arch'
Walking inside a ‘fin’ on the way to see the ‘Sandstone Arch’

 

With this photo, I took my rented 10-18 mm lens and took a bracket. But! I found out that I didn’t really need all of them. this was taken from a single raw file.

I hope my processing is coming around. I’m sorry I haven’t posted too much lately. I usually slow down my art when I’m learning more skills. Away from photography, I’ve also been working more overtime, too.

I am hopeful to get more up soon. Tomorrow, I will actually show you the Sandstone Arch, though!

Also posted to:

fullperspectivephotos.smugmug.com

plus.google.com/+adamdooley

One Way out