Tag Archives: Adler Planetarium

August 2015

This month I am showing many pictures that have been taken from the City of Chicago plus a few from elsewhere in the Midwest. Most of these pictures are basically previews that I have yet to finish off before I put them up in the rest of social media. 🙂

This is kind of interesting to look at this month. And I like the idea of doing a monthly recap of what I’ve done . And, I think I can feel the growth here, too. I’ve had my first experiment with textures. I think I’m finally starting to understand how to compose curving features in camera, too.  I met a world famous photographer, and I also met a pioneer in pinhole photography from Columbia University. She encouraged me to do something I thought was stupid. Have you ever seen someone holding up their hands in the shape of a window to look through? Well, if you do this to get a similar field of view as your lens of choice, it’s actually a good exercise!

I toured Little Italy in Chicago as part of my quest to photograph every official neighborhood of Chicago. This is a relatively new quest, btw. Little Italy is a nice neighborhood that includes the University of Illinois at Chicago. But there are some sobering sights, which I have included.

This gallery is from the beginning of August when I spent a day in the Loop.

Throughout this month I will rework some of these pictures. So, I will produce separate blog posts for each final rework I do.

Thanks for viewing my photos.

Just keep trying and see you next time!

The first weekend of the month in Chicago’s Loop.

This gallery is the Trey Ratcliff Photowalk in Chicago. It was really cool and the weather was perfect.

 

My Non Chicago Pictures for the month!

My last weekend in Chicago in August 2015. The first half of these photos are from my photo walk through Little Italy.

 

Skyline over Iceline – Chicago

The skyline of the Chicago Loop is often photographed from this point, the Adler Planetarium. On this late January morning, however, I was looking for something different. All of this ice had recently built itself up on the cement wall separating the museum campus from Lake Michigan. The soft predawn sunlight was only beginning to brighten up the city. The smooth curves of the ice also was interesting. I found that if I lay down on the ice, I could place it under Lake Shore Drive with the skyline coming up and out of the ice. The street lights also added a little interesting bokeh, too. The only hard contrasting line in the image is the line separating the city from the ice.

The Chicago Skyline placed above the a small icewall closed to the Planetarium.
The Chicago Skyline placed above the a small icewall close to the Planetarium.

New Years 2015 – Skyline Photography

I don’t usually like to get thick into the weeds when it comes to creating a photo. I do get technical, but I’m fully aware lots of people don’t like reading all that stuff.

I’m preparing to do a skyline panorama of Chicago. This morning I went to the Adler Planetarium to take these photos. It was 6 AM when I got out of the car. It was FREEEZING out, btw!

Here’s the photo:

Chicago Skyline from Adler Planetarium. New Years morning, 2015.
Chicago Skyline from Adler Planetarium. New Years morning, 2015.

I took about 5 images going from left to right. This one is roughly the center image. Whenever I do a panorama, I almost always at MOST move the camera’s field of view only about 1/3 of the frame.  Then I take another photo.

When I’m stitching a panorama, I’ll try it one of two different ways. First, I’ll try it in Photoshop. This is usually easy but also takes a long time for the computer to do.

The second method I use is a free program from Microsoft called Microsoft Composite Editor. This program is actually pretty quick. The knock I have against it is that it requires me to create 16-bit tiff files to my hard drive.

But the problem that I have with creating panoramas happens regardless of which program I use. A panorama program will stretch the image if you tell it to stitch to maintain PERSPECTIVE. The tends to stretch the lines so that they are all straight. Straight lines matter with architecture. But, it stretches out the sky, too. What is the problem with that? What used to be clean and clear sky is now showing pixels that I couldn’t previously see.

There are several things I can do to minimize that, but it takes a bit more work. It would be lovely if there was a tool that minimized this problem all in one step, though.

So, that’s my riff on panorama stitching. If you found it interesting, let me know.